Visiting an Auburn treasure.

As I write this on Tuesday night, my spirits are high. I had a great day at the flower shop. I spent some quality time with friends and visited our farmers market. It seemed like a beautiful evening, so I decided to take a stroll through our beautiful Hoopes Park. I like going up on summer Tuesdays because there is, during the summer months, a concert in the park, near Walnut Street, and it is followed by a movie once the sun goes down. Sure, it is usually a children’s film, but what fun it is to sit on the grass and see all the folks just relaxing and enjoying. Tonight, the music was by the T.J. Sacco Band; they played great music for more than two hours and the film was the not-so-old “Emoji Movie.” If you have not taken the time to make this Tuesday visit, you will never know what a great time you are missing. Why, it is almost like going back some 50 years, when concerts like this were common. As I looked over the crowd, it seems that it would have made a great Norman Rockwell cover for The Saturday Evening Post. So there are still a couple more nights to enjoy the music and to stop by the Kiwanis hot dog and hamburger stand. They are there on Tuesdays with great foods and fine conversation as they raise money for good things.

Tonight, there was a bonus. Law Enforcement Appreciation Day was being celebrated at the northern, Genesee Street end of the park. As I strolled around the gazebo, there were tents and the air was filled with music and the smells of great food. A fire truck was spraying water into the pond and there were plenty of law enforcement folks answering questions and having conversations. It was just nice to see the activity. After my first walk around the park and the pond to see all the activity, it was time to stroll around to see the flowers, and there are a lot of them.

As I entered the park from Herman Avenue, the first plants I saw were several clusters of magnificent white hydrangeas, and nearby was another planting of them with white flowers that had begun to turn a brilliant pink on the top third of each blossom. And right around the bend in the path, a huge bed of black-eyed Susan. It had to be some 30 feet long and 10 feet wide. It was not just a big square bed, but a lazy oval. As I looked to my left, there were just a few orange blooms on what was, probably, a fantastic show of tiger lilies. These are the ones that we see by our roadsides during late June and in July.Then, of course, I came upon the great circle with a little pond. And right there, at the ground level, there were sedum plants. It is early in the season, so they were simply an emerald green in color. Still, they were very showy. Give them a few cold nights and that color will turn to mauve. Cut some, but please, not from the park. You will be surprised at how beautiful a bouquet you can make.

Then, of course, I came upon the great circle with a little pond. And right there, at the ground level, there were sedum plants. It is early in the season, so they were simply an emerald green in color. Still, they were very showy. Give them a few cold nights and that color will turn to mauve. Cut some, but please, not from the park. You will be surprised at how beautiful a bouquet you can make.

As I made my way around the bed, there was a great display of mixed flowers, Lazy Susans, purple cone flowers and perennial phlox in bright colors. That melded into another bed, this one with white phlox and purple cone flowers. Striking! And then, there it was: Poppy’s Ice Cream Truck. I think that I will not test my sugars tonight.

There were flowers everywhere, in spite of the terrible growing season that we have been having. And what ties it all together: As you walk along the paths you will see small signs, courtesy of Seymour Library, each a different page from a children’s story book. Bring the grand kids and read them a story as you enjoy the flowers.

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